FAQ
Newfoundland Dogs
What color are Newfoundland dogs? Newfoundlands can be black, brown, grey, or white and black. Black is the dominant colour. Their eyes are dark brown. Newfoundlandpuppies of any colour can be born with some white fur, especially on thechest.
How big are Newfoundland dogs ?

Newfoundland males range from 59-68 kg and stand about 71 cm high at the shoulder; females range from 45-54 kg and stand about 61-66 cm high. Puppies gain nearly their full adult weight and height in 18 months.

Where do Newfoundland dogs come from?

The Newfoundland dog comes from Newfoundland. The breed was recognized here around 1775 and is one of the oldest breeds of dogs in existence. It descended from many dogs probably brought to the island by North American Aboriginals, Viking explorers, and European whalers and fishermen. Dogs which are many-many-times great grandparents of the Newfoundland are the Norse bear dog, the Tibetan Mastiff, the Great Pyrenees, Basques water spaniels, various sheep dogs, retrievers, and other working dogs brought from England, France, Spain, and Portugal.

Do Newfoundland dogs need training?

Yes. Newfoundlands are working dogs with soft mouths for water rescue. They can pull carts or sleds, carry like pack mules, retrieve game, track, mind children, and rescue drowning people. They are intelligent and willing workers, but when work free they just want to hang out with their owners. Newfoundlands are happiest around people as part of the family. They are gentle, with sweet temperaments, and loyal and loving manners. Training them to care for children makes them wonderful child companions - dependable, considerate, resourceful, and gentle but firm. Healthy, active families will keep family members and their dogs well behaved, active, and fit. Puppies must be taught to obey rules, to come, sit, lie, stay, and walk beside the owner. One person should be professionally trained with the animal and pass the information along to all family members.

Do Newfoundlands need grooming? Yes. Newfoundlands are water dogs with furry webbed feet anddouble, water-resistant coats of soft fur inside and long tough fur outside, able to swim in cold water. Their outer fur must be regularly brushed, trimmed, and thinned. The soft under fur needs regular, frequent brushing, especially during fall when it thickens and spring when it sheds. Grooming helps your dog "change" its winter and summer coats.Puppies should be brushed regularly so they enjoy being groomed whenfully grown.
Where should I get a Newfoundland dog?

Always deal with certified breeders, who love and understand the breed and know the pedigree and health of their animals. A good breeder will want to know a lot about you and your ability to be a caring and responsible owner of a Newfoundland dog.

Bibliography:
Drury, Mrs. Maynard K. (ed.). This is The Newfoundland. Official Publication of the Newfoundland Club of America. Illustrated by Ernest H. Hart, 2nd ed. (Neptune City, NJ: T.F.H. Publications, 1978). Kosloff, Joanna. Newfoundlands. Illustrated by Tana Hakanson. (Hauppauge, NY: Barronπs Educational Series, 1996).

 

Labrador Retrievers
What color are Labrador Retrievers?

Labradors can be black, yellow, and brown. Black is the dominant colour. Eyes are brown in black and yellow dogs and brown or hazel in brown ones.

How big are Labradors?

Labrador males range from 30-36 kg and stand about 57-62 cm high at the shoulder; females range from 25-32 kg and stand about 54.5 cm high. Puppies gain nearly their full adult weight and height in 18 months.

Where do Labradors come from?

The Labrador retriever comes from Newfoundland, but the breed was developed in England and recognized there as a sporting dog in the 19th century. It descended from the black, thick-coated water dogs which worked with fishermen in Newfoundland in the 16th century. Over many years some dogs became smaller and rough coated (as opposed to thick coated and large Newfoundland dogs). These smaller black dogs became known first as Labrador Newfoundlands and later as Lesser Newfoundlands or St. John's Dogs. In the 1800s many of these smaller dogs were exported to England where breeding with black retrieving setters, pointers, and flat-coated retrievers resulted in today's Labrador retriever. Labradors retain the soft mouths, webbed feet, and dominant black colour gene of their Newfoundland cousins; they can be gentle and strong like them and similarly active in cold water.

Do Labradors need training?

Yes. Labradors are sporting dogs which can track, point, and (especially) retrieve game; they also function as seeing-eye dogs, as companion and therapy dogs, in military and police work, in assisting the handicapped, and in disaster rescue work. They also make excellent pets enjoying the company of adults and children alike and making active family participants. Healthy, active families will keep family members and their dogs well behaved, active, and fit. Puppies must be taught to obey rules, to come, sit, lie, stay, and walk beside family members. They need to be restrained from chewing family possessions.

Do Labradors need grooming?

Not especially. Labradors are web-footed water dogs whose water-resistant coats of soft fur inside and short thick fur outside enable them to swim in cold water. Their outer fur repels dirt and water and needs only occasional brushing. The soft under fur sheds naturally in the spring. Labradors should not be bathed too frequently (and then with mild soap) to retain the oils in their fur which keeps them dry when swimming. Yellow Labradors may need spot cleaning.

Where should I get a Labrador puppy?

Always deal with certified breeders, who love and understand the breed and know the pedigree and health of their animals. A good breeder will want to know a lot about you and your ability to be an caring and responsible owner of a friendly, active Labrador.

Bibliography:
Kern, Kerry V. Labrador Retrievers: A Complete Pet Owner's Manual. Illustrated by Michele Earle-Briggs. 2nd ed. (Hauppauge, NY: Barron's Educational Series, 1987, 1995).